News of Interest: Mom, Champion for “Laree’s Law” in NY, Dies of Cancer

[July 27, 2018 — Times Union, Albany, NY] In Anti-Heroin Activist and Albany Cop Patty Farrell Dies, city editor Mike Goodwin informs readers of the death of Patty Farrell, “who after her daughter’s death from a heroin overdose became a driving force behind the region’s anti-opioid effort.” Patty, 51, died from cancer.

Patty’s 19-year-old daughter died of an overdose in 2013, and her advocacy included championing the passage of legislation in her daughter’s memory, “Laree’s Law,” which opens the door to charging people selling an opioid that is implicated in a fatality with homicide. The law is now in committee in the New York Assembly.

Speaking to students in 2015 at Colonie High School, Patty said: “‘It’s an absolute hellish nightmare. There has to be a way to stop heroin. We have to work together. Please help me do something about it so nobody else dies like my daughter did.'”

Patty opens the video clip below with a poignant statement about losing Laree. The clip is a promotion for a documentary film by the New York State Funeral Directors Association that features the stories of families who experienced an overdose death.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Funeral Directors’ Challenges with Substance-Use Death Explored

[July 22, 2018 — Daily Herald, suburban Chicago, IL] In How Rise in Opioid Deaths Takes Toll on Funeral Home Operators, reporter Marie Wilson takes a hard look at how a vital industry is being affected by the opioid epidemic. The article covers all angles of the issue, including a funeral home getting involved in naloxone (or Narcan) training, how the number of sudden deaths affects funeral home staff, and how supporting bereaved people after a death from substance-use can be especially challenging.

Funeral director Marya Gibbons says that this kind of death has “‘a different aftershock,'” and the article explains that “opioid-related deaths cause an unusual form of grief, so throughly mired with guilt, shame, confusion, regret, anger, envy, failure and uncertainty, that even those used to consoling families say they’re sometimes at a loss.”

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Mormon Actress & Grieving Mom Creates Poignant Video

[June 18, 2018 — Church News, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints] In New Video Shares How LDS Actress Found Peace after Losing Son to Addiction, news contributor Savannah Hopkinson updates the story of Shaunna Thompson, who has spoken out about her experience of grief after her son Chase died of an overdose in 2016. The brief video, below, gets to the essence of a mother’s experience of a child dying from substance use, and Shaunna describes it as raw and says “‘it was a little hard to watch .. but that’s good. Sometimes the raw isn’t always addressed, and the ugly, dark side of it isn’t always portrayed.” In an hourlong interview with Lindsay Spear of the Everyday Mormon Girl Podcast, Shaunna delves even more deeply into the relationship between her faith, her loss, and her grief.

 

 

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Memorial Music Festival Supports “Sun Will Rise Foundation”

[July 14, 2018 — The Patriot Ledger, Quincy, Mass.] In Local Bands Play to End Addiction Stigma at Braintree Music Festival, reporter Amy McKeever captures the scene at a fund-raiser where the crowd enjoys  food, games and local bands as well as having access to addiction recovery information and Narcan training. The Beanstock Music Festival, now in its third year, supports The Sun Will Rise Foundation, founded by Robyn Houston-Bean in memory of her son Nick. “’We’re out here saying that Nick died from an overdose, so that other people don’t feel alone or feel like they have to hide if they’re struggling,’” explains Robyn.

In addition to its prevention and advocacy work, the foundation provides grief support for people who have lost a loved one to substance use, and is part of a growing network of grief support in Massachusetts.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Survivor Explains Grief with Simple Observations of Loss

[July 13, 2018 — Delaware Online] In When a Drug Overdose Kills Your Child, This Is What It Does to Your Life, MaryBeth Cichocki offers a first-person view of grief after losing her 37-year-old son Matt Klosowski to an overdose in 2015. The article is, in fact, a prose poem in which she makes dozens of simply stated observations that could not be more poignant:

  • Losing your child goes against the cycle of life.
  • Every day, this club adds more members.
  • Life is now in pieces.
  • Your grief is palpable.
  • You ask for signs. You look to the sky …
  • You are trying to find a new meaning to life.
  • Your journey is to honor your child …
  • Their fight is over. Yours has begun.
  • You are the mother of an addict. You will not be silenced.

MaryBeth is a regular contributor to The Fix. Her blog is Mother’s Heartbreak.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Parents Focus on Prevention in Memory of Children Lost

[July 2, 2018 — Times News, Lehighton, PA] In Grief Powers Parents to Help Others in Hopes of Preventing Overdoses, reporter Chris Reber talks to surviving parents of children lost to the opioid epidemic who are taking action to save lives in the coal region of Pennsylvania. Tammy Rusnock Kline is raising money for a local prevention coalition on behalf of her daughter Chrissy; Cindy Kester and her husband sponsored a poster for the coalition in memory of their child; and John and Tammy Sienkiewicz are honoring their daughter Alexandria through a nonprofit they founded, Safer Streets for Tamaqua’s Little Feet.

Below is a short documentary about the Sienkiewicz family’s experience, created by the musician Kulick, who went to school in the town where Alex grew up. A song Kulick composed based on a poem Alex wrote is available here.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Families Lobby for Safe, Legal, Regulated Drug Supply

[June 23, 2018 — Globe & Mail, Vancouver, BC] In “How Could This Happen?” After Losing Loved Ones to Opioids, Grieving Relatives Take Action, reporter Andrea Woo covers the advocacy of Moms Stop the Harm, which is working in Canada for the decriminalization of drug possession and consumption, as well as access to safer, regulated sources of substances. The article tells of three families who lost a loved one to overdoses — and of how their views of drug laws have been shaped by their experiences.

The point of view of Jennifer Hedican, who lost her 26-year-old son to an overdose last year, is representative: “’I didn’t know you could love a drug user,’ Ms. Hedican said … ‘I thought that was something you never wanted someone to be, and if they chose that, that was just horrible. They didn’t choose it … [and] I’m ashamed of the views that I had before, and that I never took the opportunity to examine them and to say, Where did I get these views from?’”

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Teen Calls Death of Second Family Member “Surreal”

[June 19, 2018 — Toledo, OH] In a WTVG TV interview [story begins at the 58-second mark], reporter Melissa Voetsch talks to Charles Boiselle after the 16-year-old received a gift from the Boyk Law Bikes for Kids program. Charles’s sister, Brandi, died of a heroin overdose in May, and their father died of an overdose two years ago. “‘For awhile it starts to feel kind of surreal,’ [Charles says,] ‘like, am I in a dream right now, and this person’s going to walk through the door the next day and everything’s going to be fine?'”  He calls the gift of a new bicycle “‘one of those little lights in the darkness.'”

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Mother’s Book Called “Beautiful, Raw, Strangely Uplifting”

[June 12, 2018 — The Hollywood Reporter] In ‘Goliath’ PA’s Mother Translates Grief Into New Book, staff writer Chris Gardner covers the recent release of Lukelove. My Boy, My Grief, My Journal: Losing a Child to Opioids, by Sheila Scott, whose 23-year-old son, Luke, died of an overdose in 2016. Luke’s story became well-known a few months after he died when Billy Bob Thornton dedicated his Golden Globe for “Goliath” to Luke, who was a production assistant for the show. The book, which one Amazon reviewer called “beautiful, raw, and strangely uplifting,” also has a companion website.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

News of Interest: Grieving Mom Pleas for Any Witness to Call for Help

[July 6, 2018 — Independent Tribune, Concord, NC] In Daughter’s Overdose Death Spurs Mom to Raise Awareness, reporter Erin Weeks shares the story of Amy Sloop-Morris, whose 19-year-old daughter Taylor died of a fentanyl overdose last November. Amy learned that several people may have known that Taylor had become unresponsive, but they failed to call for help — and she pleas for people, even if they are involved with drugs at the scene, to call for help to save someone’s life: “‘I have learned that there are so many other fathers and mothers out there like me with almost identical stories, and every day now I find someone new who has lost their child.'” Learn more about Amy’s advocacy and education efforts at her “Justice for Taylor” Facebook page.

News of Interest” links readers to stories and information related to grief after a death from substance use.

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